Gov't wants to trash stored egg powder

May 19, 2006

A U.S. attorney and the Food and Drug Administration want to destroy 24.75 tons of stored powdered eggs they claim are dangerous for people to eat.

U.S. Attorney Mary Beth Buchanan said the eggs stored in a Pittsburgh facility are contaminated with salmonella and other bacteria.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports the eggs stem from a 2001 case where an Ohio woman and Illinois man were convicted of mislabeling the egg powder as magic cures for disease like AIDS and cancer.

Dr. Marilyn Coleman and Mitchell Kaminski were sentenced to six months in a halfway house and five years probation.

Coleman had been paying $478.57 a month to keep the eggs in the storage facility, although U.S. marshals made sure they weren't moved.

On Monday the government filed a notice of intent it would seize and destroy the egg powder.

Coleman said she will challenge it in the hopes of being able to re-test the powder for quality and then resell it for food.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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