Discovery scheduled for important move

May 1, 2006
Space Shuttle Discovery

NASA officials say an important milestone for the upcoming Space Shuttle Discovery mission will occur May 12, when the shuttle is moved from its hangar.

The move from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center is known as the rollover. Inside the assembly building, Discovery will be attached to a redesigned external fuel tank and twin solid rocket boosters.

Discovery's launch is set for July 1, with a launch window that extends to July 19.

During its 12-day mission to the International Space Station, Discovery's crew of seven will test new hardware and techniques to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies to the station.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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