15th-century painters' remains exhumed

May 21, 2006

The Moscow Patriarchate has kept secret for years the discovery of the remains of an esteemed icon-painter, Andrei Rublev, and his elder colleague.

Russia's Novosti News Agency reports that the remains, found under an alter at St. Andronicus, has been a Patriarchate secret for at least 10 years.

Rublev and fellow icon-painter Daniil Cherny died around 1430. While restoring the Savior's Cathedral in 1992, an excavation team discovered numerous graves.

Forensic anthropologist Sergei Nikitin, hired to study specific graves, discovered that the corpses of two monks had been exhumed and reburied. It was only recently revealed that the corpses are those of the two 15th-century icon-painters.

The two painters were difficult to identify because, as monks, they lived in anonymity and never signed their works, Novosti said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Forensic chemists verify human remains from fat deposits

Related Stories

Forensic chemists verify human remains from fat deposits

November 3, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- In the absence of evidence such as bones, clothing or strands of hair, forensic investigators can verify whether a body decomposed at a site indoors by looking for traces of lingering fat deposits, according ...

Story of 4.5 million-year-old whale unveiled in Huelva

December 15, 2009

In 2006, a team of Spanish and American researchers found the fossil remains of a whale, 4.5 million years old, in Bonares, Huelva. Now they have published, for the first time, the results of the decay and fossilisation process ...

Team unlocks clues in unidentified human remains

April 15, 2015

Like something out of "CSI" or "Bones," researchers at Arizona State University are working to solve the mysteries of unidentified human remains - and just as on those TV shows, science plays a key role.

Where ants go when nature calls

February 18, 2015

Ants may use the corners of their nest as 'toilets,' according to a study published February 18, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tomer Czaczkes and colleagues from University of Regensburg, Germany.

Recommended for you

Biologists trace how human innovation impacts tool evolution

November 24, 2015

Many animals exhibit learned behaviors, but humans are unique in their capacity to build on existing knowledge to make new innovations. Understanding the patterns of how new generations of tools emerged in prehistoric societies, ...

First Londoners were multi-ethnic mix: museum

November 23, 2015

A DNA analysis of four ancient Roman skeletons found in London shows the first inhabitants of the city were a multi-ethnic mix similar to contemporary Londoners, the Museum of London said on Monday.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.