UGS gives $289M grant to Ohio University

April 20, 2006

UGS Corp. announced Wednesday a $289 million grant to enhance engineering programs at the University of Cincinnati.

The in-kind software grant is the largest the school has ever received.

It includes UGS management software products such as NX, Solid Edge and Teamcenter product suites for students and faculty.

"We are committed to helping leading academic institutions such as the University of Cincinnati expand career development opportunities for students and cultivate a talented base of candidates to increase the competitiveness of Cincinnati- and Ohio-focused, national and global manufacturers," said Dave Shirk, executive vice president, Global Marketing for UGS.

"Through this and other similar grants, UGS is empowering knowledge for 21st Century engineers to tie into global innovation networks that the world's leading manufacturers are leveraging to build the most innovative products," he added.

The grant is made possible through UGS' Global Opportunities in Product Lifestyle Management initiative, which provides in-kind grants commercial valued at some $2 billion annually, the company said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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