New Sony Cyber-Shot Camera Clears Up Life's Blurry Moments

April 6, 2006
Cyber-shot camera DSC-T30
Cyber-shot camera DSC-T30

Sony is building up its arsenal of anti-blur, digital still cameras to help people who are out on the town win the fight against blur with the introduction of the new 7.2-megapixel Cyber-shot DSC-T30 model.

Everybody's feeling the vibe and you want a group shot before leaving dinner or the party. Don't make everyone pose and re-pose, smiling as if they're suffering from lock jaw, while you take shot after shot trying to get a good picture.

Equipped with double anti-blur protection, you can press the DSC-T30 model's Super Steady Shot optical image stabilization and high-sensitivity mode buttons in seconds, and reduce the chance of taking a blurry picture the very first time - especially in low-light conditions.

The Super Steady Shot technology minimizes blur caused by shaky hands, while the new camera's high light sensitivity (ISO 1000) mode reduces blur resulting from shooting at faster shutter speeds. There's even added defense with Sony's Clear RAW noise reduction system, which kicks in to counter picture noise associated with high-sensitivity shooting.

These technologies make the camera ideal for shooting in low-light conditions, such as restaurants, bars and clubs. Combined with its stylish finish and svelte dimensions, the DSC-T30 camera is the perfect accessory for even the most discerning "fashionista."

Armed with features for optimal shooting and sharing, the new camera with its Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar 3x optical zoom lens combines power, portability and distinctive playback. Its slide show with music function is ideal for viewing on the camera's three-inch, Clear Photo LCD Plus screen.

This is Sony's first T-series model to feature selectable color modes. Choose natural mode for subtle color variations or vivid mode for more intense colors, depending on how you want to preserve the mood from your night on the town.

Sony's ultra-fast Real Imaging Processor circuitry increases the camera's efficiency for quicker start-up, faster shot-to-shot times, higher-quality movie capture, and longer battery life. Its supplied InfoLithium battery provides plenty of power - up to 420 shots per full charge. That's nearly double the performance of previous T-series models.

The camera has 58MB of internal memory, just in case you forget your memory card. Its capacity can be expanded up to two gigabytes, however, with an optional Memory Stick Duo media card.

The Cyber-shot DSC-T30 camera will be available next month for about $500.

"When people are out having a good time, they don't want to spend it learning how to avoid taking blurry pictures," said James Neal, director of marketing for digital imaging products at Sony Electronics. "We've engineered our flagship T-series camera with intelligent, automatic features so people can spend more time having fun and less time understanding technology."

Source: Sony

Explore further: Engineers unlock remarkable 3-D vision from ordinary digital camera technology

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