New Siemens base station for 3G wireless

April 6, 2006

Siemens released a new base station Thursday that works with both second-generation and third-generation GSM wireless communications.

The Multi-standard Base Station allows wireless operators to make use of the radio elements of both generations without the need for separate systems.

"Whether operators are deploying 3G services now or in the future, the system helps provide investment protection," said Harald Braun, president of Siemens' Networks Division.

Standard 19-inch second-generation base transceiver stations can be upgraded by sliding a small radio server unit into the existing rack, giving them the ability to support multiple standards.

Siemens contended that the MBS is currently the only way for wireless operators to make their second-generation base stations capable of handling 3G technology.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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