Scientific research to expand in Wisconsin

April 11, 2006

A $50-million gift is being used to pioneer scientific collaborations at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The $150-million public-private center for biomedical research will focus on biomedical devices, nanotechnology, microbial science, computer science and biology, The Wisconsin State Journal reported Tuesday.

The $50-million gift from UW-Madison alumni John and Tashia Morgridge is designed to allow scientists to work on stem-cell research that is free from federal restrictions, the newspaper said.

The Morgridge donation will be matched by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, as well as a state contribution, university officials said.

The public institute will serve as a source of cutting-edge research and technology. The private institute -- to be called the Morgridge Institute for Research -- will encourage collaboration with industry and enable the WID to respond more quickly to scientific opportunities as they arise.

The gifts are contingent on the Wisconsin State Building Commission approving the project during its April 19 meeting.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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