Samsung makes first 2GB phone memory card

April 19, 2006
Samsung makes first 2GB phone memory card

Samsung Wednesday unveiled a 2 gigabyte MultiMediaCard (MMCmicro) memory card that it called the "smallest, fastest and highest capacity memory card for mobile phones." It combines four 4Gbit NAND flash devices.

The diminutive MMCmicro is about the size of a fingernail (12mmx14mmx1.1mm) but transmits data more than three times faster than other cards and can download three hours of mobile video in less than two minutes.

An adapter allows the card to be plugged into any multimedia card slot.

The device's ability to operate at either 1.8 or 3.3 volts makes it particularly useful in the design of mobile phones, Samsung said.

The 2GB card comes out of the lab just three months after Samsung announced it had developed a 1GB card, which will be commercially available this year.

According to Dataquest, a semiconductor market research firm, as the global memory card market will grow five percent between 2005 and 2010, the multimedia card market will grow 17% and the MMCmicro market by 95 percent during the same period.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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