Nuclear puts renewable energy at risk

April 14, 2006

A new report from Dr Catherine Mitchell and Dr Bridget Woodman of Warwick Business School at the University of Warwick in the UK, examining the contribution nuclear power could make to the UK's energy 'mix', says that if the UK Government opts for new nuclear build, it risks becoming locked into expensive technology that won't help reduce carbon emissions.

The authors say that in order to tackle rising emissions, the government will need to transform the remaining 92 per cent or so of the energy market.

The report is published by Warwick Business School and commissioned by environmental think tank, Green Alliance. It analyses the market mechanisms and liability assurances that the government would have to introduce to persuade investors to put their money into nuclear, and the consequences this could have for the rest of the energy market.

The report authors say that if Government decided to take the nuclear route there could be an undermining of liberalisation and privatisation within the overall energy industry, and any development of non-nuclear - such as renewables - could be prejudiced.

Source: University of Warwick

Explore further: US proposes 17-year delay in start of Hanford nuclear cleanup — until 2039

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