NASA: Physics teachers to go weightless

April 27, 2006

Six teams of high-school physics teachers will test experiments developed by their students aboard NASA's "Weightless Wonder" aircraft next month.

NASA says the experiments are intended to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's discoveries.

NASA -- along with the World Year of Physics, the American Association of Physics Teachers, and the American Physical Society -- selected six proposed experiments from U.S. high-school students and teachers to be conducted aboard the C-9 airplane while it provides a series of maneuvers over the Gulf of Mexico to create weightlessness.

The teachers will arrive at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston May 4 and will conducted the experiments the week of May 8.

The selected teams and experiments are:

-- Beaumont High School, Cleveland Heights, Ohio: Free-Standing Liquid Bridges.

-- Circle High School, Towanda, Kan.: Mathematics of Microgravity.

-- Columbus High School, Columbus, Ga.: Space Communication and Spacecraft Tumbling.

-- Glenbrook North High School, Northbrook, Ill.: Electrostatics of Granular Materials and Surface Tension.

-- Greendale High School, Greendale, Wis.: Magnificent Magnets

-- Roosevelt High School, Seattle: Robot Pointer

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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