In Brief: HP recalls laptop computer batteries

April 21, 2006
HP_tetka!

Hewlett Packard is recalling computer batteries from about 15,700 of its laptop computers as a fire hazard.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said the manufacturer had received 20 reports of batteries overheating, of which two were filed from within the United States.

The recall is for lithium ion rechargeable batteries made in early January 2005 that have a bar-code label starting with L3.

The batteries were manufactured in China, and the computers with the product were sold in the United States for between $1,000 and $3,000.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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