In Brief: Egg donors sue S. Korean hospitals

April 22, 2006

Two women who donated eggs for research by South Korean cloning expert Hwang Woo-Suk have filed a lawsuit claiming they were misled about the risks.

They are seeking 32 million won ($33,600) from the government and from two institutions involved in Hwang's research -- Mizmedi Hospital and Hanyang University Medical Center -- the Korea Times reported.

Hwang's claims about cloning human stem cell lines were exposed as fraudulent. He was fired by Seoul National University and is the target of a criminal investigation.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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