In Brief: New Edge speeds non-broadband card payment

April 20, 2006

New Edge Networks has a narrowband Internet solution to process credit-card transactions in areas without broadband access.

The Always-On Internet Service provides a constant connection between a store and the processing center without the need to dial in each time a transaction is made.

"Our Always-on Internet Service is an effective interim access option until DSL service is available for merchants that cannot justify the cost of filling in non-DSL locations with frame relay connections," said New Edge Vice President Greg Griffiths.

The service is available for about $100 per month and requires a dedicated business-grade phone line; however, the line can be shared by multiple cash registers.

New Edge is making use of network interconnections through EarthLink, which completed its acquisition of Vancouver-based New Edge earlier this month.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: In fight on terror, encryption is double-edged sword

Related Stories

Netflix for live, local TV? It could happen

November 14, 2015

A couple of San Diego entrepreneurs, former executives from the wireless and cable TV industries, believe they can accomplish what might seem impossible: deliver live, local broadcast television - not bundled in a cable package ...

The future of the Internet

September 16, 2015

The current buzzwords that one might hear flung across the boardroom tables of internet and telecommunications companies might include, "the cloud", "ubiquitous computing", "internet of things", "pervasive computing", "distributed ...

Recommended for you

Physicists develop new technique to fathom 'smart' materials

November 26, 2015

Physicists from the FOM Foundation and Leiden University have found a way to better understand the properties of manmade 'smart' materials. Their method reveals how stacked layers in such a material work together to bring ...

Nevada researchers trying to turn roadside weed into biofuel

November 26, 2015

Three decades ago, a University of Nevada researcher who obtained one of the first U.S. Energy Department grants to study the potential to turn plants into biofuels became convinced that a roadside weed—curly top gumweed—was ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.