Archaeologists search Olympic site

April 27, 2006

Archeologists are flocking to East London and the site of the 2012 Summer Olympics, making the area Britain's largest archaeological dig in history.

Archeologists already have reported uncovering evidence of human occupation dating back to 6000 B.C., The Independent reported Thursday. The scientists must complete the dig before the area becomes Europe's largest construction site. Among other venues, workers will build an 80,000-seat stadium, a 17,000-bed athlete's village, a velo park and an aquatic center.

Kieron Tyler, senior archaeologist at the Museum of London, told The Independent the Olympic development offers an unprecedented opportunity to obtain a glimpse of the past.

"This will tell the story of the changing landscape and exactly how human intervention has constantly influenced the environment. It is a unique opportunity to do it on such a huge scale," Tyler said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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