Virtual reality used to train surgeons

March 2, 2006

A Case Western Reserve University scientist in Cleveland says he's developing a way to use virtual reality simulation to train brain and heart surgeons.

"Simulation is a popular training tool because it reduces the learning time and allows students to learn independently," said M. Cenk Cavusoglu, an assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science.

Prior to joining Case in 2002, Cavusoglu helped develop laparoscopic and endoscopic tools at the University of California-Berkeley.

The challenge now, he says, is to expand such minimally invasive techniques to complex surgeries. He is also experimenting with soft tissue models and "haptics" technology to replicate the appearance and functions of the heart and brain, enabling enable surgeons to "feel" when they accomplish procedures correctly.

"Laparoscopy requires a different skill set than open surgery," Cavusoglu explains. "Surgeons typically view patients from the outside in. When a laparoscopic camera is inserted, they see patients from the inside out. Hand/eye coordination is difficult to master (so) practice on a simulator would allow surgeons to perfect their technique with no risk to patients."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Scientists bring order, and color, to microparticles

August 3, 2015

A team of New York University scientists has developed a technique that prompts microparticles to form ordered structures in a variety of materials. The advance, which appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society ...

Caterpillar chemical turns ants into bodyguards

August 3, 2015

A trio of researchers with Kobe University in Japan has found that lycaenid butterfly caterpillars of the Japanese oakblue variety, have dorsal nectary organ secretions that cause ants that eat the material to abandon their ...

Earliest evidence of reproduction in a complex organism

August 3, 2015

Researchers led by the University of Cambridge have found the earliest example of reproduction in a complex organism. Their new study has found that some organisms known as rangeomorphs, which lived 565 million years ago, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.