Briefs: Tax filing online better than an MP3?

March 21, 2006

Americans would rather give up their MP3 players than forfeit the ability to file taxes online, an AT&T survey found.

The telecommunications giant said that 68 percent of respondents said they would rather give up their digital music player before the ability to file taxes on high-speed Internet connection.

Meanwhile, 82 percent of those polled said that speed was the greatest asset of filing taxes online rather than filling out a paper form. Some 36 percent of those surveyed said that they liked being able to get their refunds sooner, as is the case when filing online.

The survey was sponsored by AT&T to highlight how broadband Internet access has an impact on filing tax returns. The findings are based on a national online survey of 1,018 adults older than 18 conducted from Feb. 28 to March 5.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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