Sharp to Introduce Industry’s Thinnest 110,000-Pixel CMOS Camera Module

March 16, 2006
Sharp to Introduce Industry’s Thinnest 110,000-Pixel CMOS Camera Module

Sharp Corporation has developed a 110,000-pixel CMOS camera module with an optical system only 1/11-inch in size. The new LZ0P396D is the industry's most compact, thinnest module, and is ideal for compact portable devices such as mobile phones. Volume shipments will begin in April 2006.

Small, high-resolution, high-performance cameras are increasingly being adopted for use in compact portable devices such as mobile phones. At the same time, the proliferation of third-generation (3G) mobile phones is continuing in tandem with the inclusion of videophone functions. For the second camera unit needed for such features, demand for super-compact camera modules that can be embedded in the limited space available in these devices is also increasing.

This new CMOS camera module developed at this time is based on proprietary Sharp high-density design technology. Improved optical system design and greater precision in molding components combine to reduce the vertical profile of the unit, resulting in the industry's thinnest profile at only 2.43 mm thick and smallest volume at 0.07 cc. Plus, the LZ0P396D also supports full-motion video capture at 30 frames per second (fps), enabling users to record smooth movie clips.

Source: Sharp

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