Robots compete this week at Purdue

March 13, 2006

Purdue University says it will host a group of college and high school students this week in a competition of robotic inventions.

The FIRST Boilermaker Regional Competition will involve 29 teams, consisting of students, mentors and their robot inventions, competing in a basketball-style game Thursday through Saturday in the Purdue Armory.

FIRST -- For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology -- combines sports with science and technology to create a unique event.

"Nearly 1,000 teens and adults will come from near and far to fill the stands to cheer on their favorite robot as they vie for the top spots," said Amy Przybylinski, co-chairperson of the event and a Purdue mechanical engineering graduate. "This is the second year for our event at Purdue, and we have a great mix of new and returning teams."

High school students work with professional engineers and high school and college teachers to design, build and test a robot in just six weeks to compete in regional competitions across the nation.

The winners of the regional events join more than 300 teams to compete in the international championship, to be held April 26-29 in Atlanta.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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