Fossil of new dinosaur species is found

March 23, 2006
A German youth sticks his head in the mouth of a dinosaur figure

Scientists reportedly have found the fossil of a previously unknown species of dinosaur that lived more than 100 million years ago in what is now Mongolia.

The dinosaur, which had air sacs in some of its bones to help support a 24-foot-long neck, belonged to a group of plant-munching giants called sauropods -- the largest animals ever to have walked the Earth, National Geographic News reported.

Paleontologists Daniel Ksepka and Mark Norell of the American Museum of Natural History in New York discovered the fossil in Mongolia's Gobi desert in 2002, including a neck vertebra that measures nearly 2 feet in length.

The newly described species is named Erketu ellisoni. Erketu, the god of might, was one of 99 deities from pre-Buddhist Mongolian tradition, NGN reported.

The paleontologists' analysis of their find was detailed in last week's issue of the museum's journal, Novitates.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Hard-won lizards: Clues in amber anoles cap long adventure for Losos

Related Stories

Jurassic saw fastest mammal evolution

July 16, 2015

Mammals were evolving up to ten times faster in the middle of the Jurassic than they were at the end of the period, coinciding with an explosion of new adaptations, new research shows.

Flies that pollinized Cretaceous plants 105 million years ago

July 10, 2015

When we think about pollination, the image that comes first to mind is a bee or a butterfly covered by pollen. However, in the Cretaceous —about 105 million years ago— bees and butterflies did not exist, and most terrestrial ...

Recommended for you

Magnetism at nanoscale

August 3, 2015

As the demand grows for ever smaller, smarter electronics, so does the demand for understanding materials' behavior at ever smaller scales. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are building a unique ...

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Study calculates the speed of ice formation

August 3, 2015

Researchers at Princeton University have for the first time directly calculated the rate at which water crystallizes into ice in a realistic computer model of water molecules. The simulations, which were carried out on supercomputers, ...

Small tilt in magnets makes them viable memory chips

August 3, 2015

University of California, Berkeley, researchers have discovered a new way to switch the polarization of nanomagnets, paving the way for high-density storage to move from hard disks onto integrated circuits.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.