England's butterflies are at risk

March 5, 2006

England's butterflies are increasingly at risk, with the number of farmland butterflies declining by 30 percent over the last 10 years, a study finds.

The study, released by Biodiversity Minister Jim Knight, was conducted for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs by Butterfly Conservation.

"Butterflies are an iconic species in their own right, and they can be good indicators of the health of the entire ecosystem, so this decline is worrying," said Knight.

"The implications for other insects, birds and mammals are concerning. The fact that this overall decline has taken place across the board means that we need to look very carefully at how we can help butterflies throughout the countryside. We also need to monitor how well environmental stewardship supports butterfly populations -- particularly those most at risk."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Neonicotinoid pesticides linked to butterfly declines in the UK

Related Stories

Use your loaf to save British wildlife

November 18, 2015

Farmers can maintain high yields and boost nature by signing up to a wildlife-friendly scheme, new research published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology has found.

Pesticide-makers point to other culprits in bee die-offs

November 23, 2015

In a Nordic-inspired building tucked in a corner of the Bayer CropScience North American headquarters, high school students wander through 6,000 square feet dedicated entirely to the specialness of bees. Children taste different ...

Risk assessment, for the birds

November 2, 2015

Every year, backyard songbirds across the United States make an arduous journey to warmer winter climes. They migrate hundreds of miles, occasionally braving tough terrain and nasty weather. Sometimes, they have no place ...

Recommended for you

Which came first—the sponge or the comb jelly?

December 1, 2015

Bristol study reaffirms classical view of early animal evolution. Whether sponges or comb jellies (also known as sea gooseberries) represent the oldest extant animal phylum is of crucial importance to our understanding of ...

Making 3-D imaging 1,000 times better

December 1, 2015

MIT researchers have shown that by exploiting the polarization of light—the physical phenomenon behind polarized sunglasses and most 3-D movie systems—they can increase the resolution of conventional 3-D imaging devices ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.