Eleksen develops keyboards for Microsoft

March 10, 2006
A Microsoft employee presents a 'Ultra Mobile Personal Computer' (UMPC)
A Microsoft employee presents a ´Ultra Mobile Personal Computer´ (UMPC)

Eleksen Ltd. said Friday it was developing a line of its "smart fabric" touch pads for use in Microsoft's just-unveiled ultra-mobile personal computers.

The planned products include a Bluetooth fabric keyboard and a USB keyboard model that will go along with the Microsoft strategy of providing an easily carried device that can do much of what larger PCs and laptops can do.

Fabric keyboards are lightweight and low-power but are large enough to make it easier for the user to type.

Eleksen said its ElekTex products would also include a variety of sensor layouts and control electronics that will be easy for original equipment manufacturers to integrate.

The UMPC, code-named "Origami" by Microsoft, was unveiled Thursday at the CeBIT electronics show in Germany. The device itself is being manufactured by Samsung and other major producers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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