Eleksen develops keyboards for Microsoft

March 10, 2006
A Microsoft employee presents a 'Ultra Mobile Personal Computer' (UMPC)
A Microsoft employee presents a ´Ultra Mobile Personal Computer´ (UMPC)

Eleksen Ltd. said Friday it was developing a line of its "smart fabric" touch pads for use in Microsoft's just-unveiled ultra-mobile personal computers.

The planned products include a Bluetooth fabric keyboard and a USB keyboard model that will go along with the Microsoft strategy of providing an easily carried device that can do much of what larger PCs and laptops can do.

Fabric keyboards are lightweight and low-power but are large enough to make it easier for the user to type.

Eleksen said its ElekTex products would also include a variety of sensor layouts and control electronics that will be easy for original equipment manufacturers to integrate.

The UMPC, code-named "Origami" by Microsoft, was unveiled Thursday at the CeBIT electronics show in Germany. The device itself is being manufactured by Samsung and other major producers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Biomedical imaging at one-thousandth the cost

Related Stories

Biomedical imaging at one-thousandth the cost

November 23, 2015

MIT researchers have developed a biomedical imaging system that could ultimately replace a $100,000 piece of a lab equipment with components that cost just hundreds of dollars.

Chris Young, Intel Security exec, on fighting cybercrime

October 16, 2015

When Intel bought McAfee five years ago, it was a surprising move by a giant chip company with a core computer hardware mission into the complex software business of protecting computers from hackers and crooks.

Big technology deals don't always compute for buyers

October 12, 2015

Dell's proposed $67 billion acquisition of data storage company EMC is the most expensive ever done involving two technology companies. Many of the tech industry's other notable deals haven't panned out as well as the buyers ...

Recommended for you

Moonlighting molecules: Finding new uses for old enzymes

November 27, 2015

A collaboration between the University of Cambridge and MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, has led researchers to identify a potentially significant new application for a well-known ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.