Deutsche Telekom, Microsoft team on IPTV

March 21, 2006
Logo for Microsoft, at their Herndon, Virginia, office

Deutsche Telekom reached an agreement Tuesday with Microsoft on an Internet Protocol Television service in Germany.

The service is slated for a mid-year launch and will be delivered over DT's VDSL (very-high bit-rate DSL) broadband networks in 10 major cities.

The service is Microsoft's largest European IPTV contract and is based on its Microsoft TV IPTV Edition software, which accommodates up to 50 megabits per second bandwidth.

DT Chairman Kai-Uwe Ricke said in a joint news release that Microsoft TV had undergone several months of testing and convinced DT that it could set the stage for a new menu of IPTV products for consumers.

"We are convinced that we will be able to offer excellent-quality IPTV services that will expand as we need them to," said Ricke. "IPTV delivered via VDSL will enable better, more service-oriented, more interactive and more customized television."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: First Delivery of Microsoft TV IPTV-Based Services Over ADSL2+

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