Manipulating cell receptor alters behavior

March 21, 2006

University at Buffalo and University of Pennsylvania scientists say two intracellular events from the same cell receptor can provoke varying behaviors.

The broad implication of the findings may alter the way behavioral neuroscientists think about sub-cellular underpinnings of mammalian behavior, according to the researchers.

The co-authors of the study were Derek Daniels, assistant professor of psychology at the University at Buffalo, and Daniel Yee, research associate professor of animal biology at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine.

"The research highlights the importance of intracellular events in the regulation of behavioral states and provides new information about the means through which a single hormone can influence multiple mammalian behaviors like learning and memory, eating, drinking, reproduction and social interaction," Daniels said.

The study, "Divergent Behavioral Roles of Angiotensin Receptor Intracellular Signaling Cascades," was published in the journal Endocrinology. It can be found online at .

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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