British supermarket chain stops cod sales

March 28, 2006

Asda, Britain's second-largest supermarket chain, says it will stop selling North Sea cod in about three months.

Asda, owned by Walmart, told The Independent it is taking the action because of a dramatic drop in natural fish stocks due to overfishing. The sale of North Sea cod is expected to be suspended by July.

Asda officials said they've been criticized by British environmentalists for selling endangered fish, such as cod, that are heading toward commercial extinction, the newspaper reported.

Asda says it plans to follow Walmart's example, selling only fish certified by the Marine Stewardship Council, the London body that checks global fisheries for sustainability and legality. The move could place Asda among Britain's most ethical supermarkets for fish, The Independent said.

Asda officials say they believe the entire North Sea should become a marine conservation zone to halt overfishing, with commercial fishing limited to local boats.

The retailer also announced it will drop swordfish within the next four months, having already removed shark, skate wings, ling, dogfish and Dover sole from its counters, The London Telegraph reported.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Lobster population is shifting north; ocean warming blamed

Related Stories

Lobster population is shifting north; ocean warming blamed

August 18, 2015

The lobster population has crashed to the lowest levels on record in southern New England while climbing to heights never before seen in the cold waters off Maine and other northern reaches—a geographic shift that scientists ...

Extreme diving, crucial to Arctic research

August 16, 2015

How do algae react to the warming of the Arctic Ocean? How is it affecting wildlife in the fjords? To find answers, researchers rely heavily on divers who brave the icy waters to gather samples.

Tracking the retreat of Arctic ice

August 2, 2015

Not so long ago, skeleton staff overwintering at the Ny-Alesund research centre could walk on the Arctic town's frozen bay and race their snow mobiles across its surface.

Shark's unique trek could help save the species

July 5, 2015

Her name is Jiffy Lube2, a relatively small shortfin mako shark that, like others of her kind, swims long distances every day in search of prey and comfortable water temperatures.

Recommended for you

Long-sought chiral anomaly detected in crystalline material

September 3, 2015

A study by Princeton researchers presents evidence for a long-sought phenomenon—first theorized in the 1960s and predicted to be found in crystals in 1983—called the "chiral anomaly" in a metallic compound of sodium and ...

Making nanowires from protein and DNA

September 3, 2015

The ability to custom design biological materials such as protein and DNA opens up technological possibilities that were unimaginable just a few decades ago. For example, synthetic structures made of DNA could one day be ...

Amateur paleontologist finds rare fossil of fish in Arizona

September 3, 2015

Growing up, Stephanie Leco often would dig in her backyard and imagine finding fossils of a tyrannosaurus rex. She was fascinated with the idea of holding something in her hand that was millions of years old and would give ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.