Pilots may get help in avoiding turbulence

February 15, 2006

A University of Alabama-Huntsville study of data from weather satellites may soon help pilots avoid turbulence caused by convective thunderstorms.

Working with colleagues at the University of Wisconsin and NASA's Langley Research Center, John Mecikalski, an assistant professor of atmospheric science, has developed a system that's about 65 percent accurate in providing a one-hour warning before heavy rain starts to fall within a thunderstorm.

"Our goal is to take existing, real-time satellite instruments and predict aviation hazards due to thunderstorms and severe weather," said Mecikalski. "(The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) is evaluating our tool, the (Federal Aviation Administration) is testing it and the Huntsville National Weather Service office used it this past summer."

Results of the research were published in the January edition of the journal "Monthly Weather Review" and will be presented during the annual winter meeting of the American Meteorological Society in Atlanta.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Sunny, with a chance of nuclear bullets

Related Stories

Sunny, with a chance of nuclear bullets

July 23, 2015

In space, far above Earth's turbulent atmosphere, you might think the one thing you don't have to worry about is weather. But you would be wrong. Just ask the people charged with the safety of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and ...

Solar Impulse to get under cover in Japan

June 2, 2015

Sunshine powered Solar Impulse 2 was expected to get under cover overnight on Tuesday, finally allowing support staff to let go of the super lightweight plane almost 24 hours after it arrived in Japan.

GOES-R satellite begins environmental testing

May 21, 2015

The GOES-R satellite, slated to launch in 2016, is ready for environmental testing. Environmental testing simulates the harsh conditions of launch and the space environment once the satellite is in orbit. The GOES-R satellite ...

Recommended for you

A cataclysmic event of a certain age

July 27, 2015

At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago—give or take a few centuries—a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas.

New blow for 'supersymmetry' physics theory

July 27, 2015

In a new blow for the futuristic "supersymmetry" theory of the universe's basic anatomy, experts reported fresh evidence Monday of subatomic activity consistent with the mainstream Standard Model of particle physics.

Dense star clusters shown to be binary black hole factories

July 29, 2015

The coalescence of two black holes—a very violent and exotic event—is one of the most sought-after observations of modern astronomy. But, as these mergers emit no light of any kind, finding such elusive events has been ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.