Briefs: Telstra calls for open N.Z. broadband loop

February 3, 2006

The head of Australia's TelstraClear Friday called for the unbundling of New Zealand's local loops as a means of expanding Kiwi broadband service.

Allan Freeth said in a news release that New Zealand's refusal to allow Local Loop Unbundling bucked an international trend and contributed directly to New Zealand Telecom's disappointing efforts to increase high-speed Internet access.

"Local loop unbundling is part of the package that will lift New Zealand's performance ... by enabling true competition in the telecommunications market," said Freeth.

The TelstraClear chief executive officer called on the government to swiftly authorize loop unbundling to allow outside broadband providers access to Telecom's nationwide infrastructure loop.

Telecom said Thursday that that it had delivered 63,000 wholesale broadband customers despite a goal of 83,000 customers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: In Brief: Ireland prods broadband loop competition

Related Stories

In Brief: Britain to study national broadband access

April 13, 2006

Britain's Office of Communications is embarking on a study of broadband providers. Specifically, Ofcom will be examining how easy it is for users to switch from one provider to another without sacrificing connectivity.

Recommended for you

New nanomaterial maintains conductivity in 3-D

September 4, 2015

An international team of scientists has developed what may be the first one-step process for making seamless carbon-based nanomaterials that possess superior thermal, electrical and mechanical properties in three dimensions.

Astronomers detect the farthest galaxy yet with Keck telescope

September 4, 2015

A team of Caltech researchers that has spent years searching for the earliest objects in the universe now reports the detection of what may be the most distant galaxy ever found. In an article published August 28, 2015 in Astrophysical ...

Secrets of a heat-loving microbe unlocked

September 4, 2015

Scientists studying how a heat-loving microbe transfers its DNA from one generation to the next say it could further our understanding of an extraordinary superbug.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.