Shenzhou VI Orbital Module Works Well 100 Days

Feb 01, 2006

The orbital module from China's Shenzhou 6 manned spacecraft has been in normal operation for 100 days, since separating from the re-entry module on Oct 17 last year.

Current monitoring data shows that all systems on the vessel, including power supply, altitude control and data management systems, are working well.

Meanwhile, onboard scientific research apparatus have also been switched on, with preliminary results coming in and a quantity of experimental data transmitted.

The module is expected to work for six months to this April.

Copyright 2006 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

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