Sharp Introduces 65V-inch LCD Monitor

February 17, 2006
Sharp Introduces 65V-inch LCD Monitor

Sharp will introduce into the Japanese market the PN-655 LCD Monitor made at the Kameyama Plant, which uses a 65V-inch full-spec high-definition LCD panel (resolution of 1,920x1,080 pixels).

The large 65V-inch screen brings images to life with its pure size. It also faithfully reproduces computer-generated images such as CAD data with impressively high-resolution and high quality right down to the finest details. And because it’s LCD, the PN-655 gives expressively colored images even in bright rooms and allows everyone in a meeting, no matter where they are sitting, to see the information on-screen with equal clarity. The high-definition videoconference function displays facial expressions with detail, so smooth, clear communication is possible wherever in the world you are. A wide range of interfaces means a wide range of networking possibilities, making the PN-655 a new, all-purpose business solution.

Major Features

1. A 65V-inch high-resolution, full-spec high-definition LCD panel (resolution of 1,920 H x 1,080 V pixels) faithfully reproduces high-definition, high-quality digital images for CAD data and videoconferencing
2. Employs a “dual fine engine,” which enables the display of both PC digital data and audio-visual images in full-spec high-definition.
3. Uses “picture in picture” and “picture by picture” functions to display various image sources simultaneously.
4. Strengthened functions for commercial use, such as a fanless design, remote control functions, and capability of around the clock operations.

Source: Sharp

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