Briefs: Satellite pay phone takes credit cards

February 21, 2006

The first Iridium-based satellite pay phone that accepts credit cards was unveiled Monday by an Arizona company.

World Communication Center said its phone will make it easier for customers to make their calls, and easier for the phone's owners to handle billing.

Satellite coverage is by Iridium, which provides satellite voice and data worldwide.

WCC officials said the $3,000 device comes equipped with a solar panel that makes it ideal for remote locations such as mines and campgrounds as well as at harbors and aboard ships where international calling is in demand.

"Through this revolutionary direct-credit-card-billing capability, WCC's satellite phones have become a profit center," said WCC President Sam Romey.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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