Study: SAT might predict life satisfaction

February 23, 2006

A Vanderbilt University study suggests the SAT -- a test many students take prior to college admission -- might be able to predict a person's success in life.

High school juniors and seniors across the nation in January took their SATs. The Vanderbilt research suggests the test may go far beyond predicting college success -- if taken during a person's early teens, it might foretell a person's post-college success and life satisfaction.

The study found high SAT scores at young ages can reveal individuals who have cognitive and creative potential for future success in such occupations as medicine, engineering and higher education.

The researchers say their study provides evidence that students who score in the top 0.01 percentile of their age group on the SAT before age 13 are more likely than a comparison group of graduate students to achieve a medical degree, earn an annual salary of at least $100,000, or secure a tenure-track position in a top-50 ranked institution.

The findings are reported in the March issue of Psychological Science.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: RetailNext CEO Alexei Agratchev on using data to drive in-store sales

Related Stories

Standardized tests not always best indicator of success

August 24, 2010

( -- Standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT have long been used in college admissions to sort through thousands of applications. Whether or not such tests accurately assess a student’s ability to succeed ...

Not ready for SAT? Teen's Web site may be the answer

March 20, 2009

In the week leading to the most recent SAT college-admission exam, some 600 students logged on to the INeed APencil Web site. There, they reviewed lessons, quizzed themselves on grammar and quadratic equations and even took ...

March Madness brings September students

August 23, 2012

(—A new study examines the impact that college sports success has in drawing prospective students. A pair of economists show how much of a bump follows a stellar season (up to 10 percent) and what types of prospective ...

Recommended for you


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.