Study: SAT might predict life satisfaction

February 23, 2006

A Vanderbilt University study suggests the SAT -- a test many students take prior to college admission -- might be able to predict a person's success in life.

High school juniors and seniors across the nation in January took their SATs. The Vanderbilt research suggests the test may go far beyond predicting college success -- if taken during a person's early teens, it might foretell a person's post-college success and life satisfaction.

The study found high SAT scores at young ages can reveal individuals who have cognitive and creative potential for future success in such occupations as medicine, engineering and higher education.

The researchers say their study provides evidence that students who score in the top 0.01 percentile of their age group on the SAT before age 13 are more likely than a comparison group of graduate students to achieve a medical degree, earn an annual salary of at least $100,000, or secure a tenure-track position in a top-50 ranked institution.

The findings are reported in the March issue of Psychological Science.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Plasmonics study suggests how to maximize production of 'hot electrons' for cheap, efficient metal-based solar cells

Related Stories

Just how effective are language learning apps?

June 17, 2015

Around 70 million people – including Bill Gates – have signed up for the language learning app Duolingo. The app has received plenty of media attention, and its creators claim that it can help anyone with a smart phone ...

Recommended for you

Short wavelength plasmons observed in nanotubes

July 28, 2015

The term "plasmons" might sound like something from the soon-to-be-released new Star Wars movie, but the effects of plasmons have been known about for centuries. Plasmons are collective oscillations of conduction electrons ...

'Expansion entropy': A new litmus test for chaos?

July 28, 2015

Can the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas? This intriguing hypothetical scenario, commonly called "the butterfly effect," has come to embody the popular conception of a chaotic system, in which ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.