MySpace teen Web site coming to cell phone

February 16, 2006

The popular social Web site MySpace will be available for access by cell phone later this year, it was reported Thursday.

A new Los Angeles-based venture called Helio has developed phones to be launched in the spring that will allow MySpace's largely teenaged user population to carry on their cyber-socializing outside the confines of their home PCs.

The project has some heavyweight support; Helio is a joint venture of Korea's SK Telecom and U.S.-based Earthlink while MySpace is part of the News Corp. family.

Red Herring explained Thursday that the notion of drawing heavy Internet users, such as teenagers, to wireless products is a top priority of major wireless and content providers.

Cell-phone Internet socializing has become a popular phenomenon among youth in Asia, but is only starting to catch on in the plum U.S. market.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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