Microsoft adds $25.2M to tech-center plan

Feb 01, 2006

Microsoft's Bill Gates said Wednesday his company will provide an additional $25.2 million to help build community technology centers.

That brings the total amount that the software giant will bring to the initiative to $152 million.

The additional money will be used to support 126 non-profit organizations that are opening or expanding technology centers in 64 countries. About 36,000 centers with 15 million users worldwide will be benefiting from the centers.

In a speech to announce the initiative, Microsoft's chief executive said that "access to training and technology skills is a key success factor in creating employment opportunities in underserved communities. ... Europe's unemployed are a major concern of governments we are working with, and our Unlimited Potential grants are supporting innovative partnerships that bring new skills to those who need them."

Gates delivered the keynote address at the Microsoft government leaders forum held in Portugal.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Vehicle fuel economy down, emissions up

Related Stories

Blacklist warnings spread on websites in North Korea

6 hours ago

North Korea, already one of the least-wired places in the world, appears to be cracking down on the use of the Internet by even the small number of foreigners who can access it with relative freedom by blacklisting ...

FDA allows marketing of vision aid via tongue for blind

Jun 23, 2015

This month Wisconsin-based company Wicab announced that the US Food and Drug Administration cleared a nonsurgical vision aid for the profoundly blind. The safety and effectiveness of their product, BrainPort ...

Recommended for you

Vehicle fuel economy down, emissions up

21 minutes ago

Gas mileage of new vehicles sold in the U.S. slipped last month, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.

A bridge to better batteries

23 minutes ago

A major automaker came to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently wanting to better understand battery degradation. After many months of intense collaborative research with a Berkeley Lab battery scientist, ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.