IBM Unveils Revolutionary Cell Broadband Engine Computer

February 8, 2006
IBM Unveils Revolutionary Cell Broadband Engine Computer
The revolutionary new high-performance IBM BladeCenter H increases the bandwidth of tiny blade computers, providing up to 10 times the capacity to move data across networks. The processing breakthrough increases the internal capability of the new system by delivering more than 40 Gigabits (Gb) of I/O bandwidth to every blade server.

At a press conference in New York today, IBM introduced a blade computing system based on the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell BE). The IBM branded Cell BE-based system is designed for businesses that need the dense computing power and unique capabilities of the Cell BE processor to tackle tasks involving graphic-intensive, numeric applications.

Based on the Power Architecture, the Cell BE processor was developed in collaboration with IBM, Sony and Toshiba Corporation. The Cell BE processor is an advanced Power Architecture-based microprocessor optimized for compute-intensive workloads and broadband media applications targeted for computer entertainment, movies and other forms of digital content.

The Cell BE-based system was previewed today at IBM's launch of new BladeCenter products in New York City. The system will rely on the Cell BE processor to accelerate key algorithms like 3D rendering, compression, and encryption, to help companies create and run highly visual, immersive, real-time applications.

Cell BE's breakthrough multi-core architecture and ultra high-speed communications capabilities deliver vastly improved, real-time response for entertainment and rich media applications. Effectively delivering 'supercomputer-like performance' by incorporating advanced multi-processing technologies used in IBM's sophisticated servers, Cell BE is especially suitable for high performance workloads across a number of industries including digital media, medical imaging, aerospace, defense and communications.

The combination of IBM's BladeCenter system with the Cell BE processor is an example of IBM's continuing collaboration with clients to help them create breakthrough solutions using IBM technology and expertise. IBM recently announced it is collaborating with Mercury Computer Systems to enable them to build Cell BE-based solutions targeted at multiple industries, IBM will also continue to work with the broader community through Blade.org, Power.org and open standards to bring additional Cell BE-based solutions to market.

IBM intends to make the Cell BE-based system available for direct purchase beginning in the third quarter of 2006, with availability via special bids now.

Source: IBM

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