U.S. greenhouse emissions up 1.7 percent

February 28, 2006

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says greenhouse gas emissions increased by 1.7 percent during 2004 from the previous year.

The increase, officials said was due primarily to an increase in carbon dioxide emissions associated with fuel and electricity consumption.

The EPA's report, "Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2004," will be open for public comment for 30 days.

The EPA said total emissions of the six main greenhouse gases during 2004 were equivalent to 7,075 million metric tons of carbon dioxide and included carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride.

Fossil fuel combustion was the largest source of emissions, accounting for 80 percent of the total. Overall, greenhouse gas emissions grew 15.8 percent from 1990 to 2004.

After responding to public comments, the United States will submit the final inventory report to the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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