Why some couples look alike

February 11, 2006

Facial characteristics can be indicative of personality traits and may be why some couples may look similar, says a University of Liverpool study.

The researchers -- in collaboration with the University of Durham and the University of St. Andrews -- asked participants to judge perceived age, attractiveness and personality traits of real-life married couples.

Photographs of female faces were viewed separately from male faces, so participants were unaware of who was married to whom.

"There is widespread belief that couples, particularly those who have been together for many years, look similar to each other," said Dr. Tony Little.

"To understand why this happens, we looked at the assumptions that people make about a person's personality, based on facial characteristics," said Little, "we found that perceptions of age, attractiveness and personality were very similar between male and female couples."

If the female face was rated as "sociable" then her partner was also more likely to be rated as "sociable," said Little.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Maori world view leads to greater life satisfaction

Related Stories

Maori world view leads to greater life satisfaction

September 17, 2015

New research from Massey University has compared work/life balance and life satisfaction levels across seven cultures – and found that New Zealand Māori scored the highest on both fronts.

Archaeologists discover 'Roman Village' in Gernsheim

September 17, 2015

During their first Gernsheim dig last year, Frankfurt University archaeologists suspected that a small Roman settlement must have also existed here in the Hessian Ried. Now they have discovered clear relics of a Roman village, ...

What sewage can tell us about health

September 15, 2015

The maxim "one man's trash is another man's treasure" certainly describes the work of Mariana G. Matus: The fourth-year PhD student in computational and systems biology at MIT is part of a team collecting samples of sewage ...

One simple question, many unexpected applications

September 15, 2015

Even the simplest research questions can lead to far-reaching public benefits. Consider Chris Small and Joel Cohen's study of global population by altitude, being honored this week at the Library of Congress.

Recommended for you

How much for that Nobel prize in the window?

October 3, 2015

No need to make peace in the Middle East, resolve one of science's great mysteries or pen a masterpiece: the easiest way to get yourself a Nobel prize may be to buy one.

Trade in invasive plants is blossoming

October 3, 2015

Every day, hundreds of different plant species—many of them listed as invasive—are traded online worldwide on auction platforms. This exacerbates the problem of uncontrollable biological invasions.

Drone market to hit $10 billion by 2024: experts

October 3, 2015

The market for military drones is expected to almost double by 2024 to beyond $10 billion (8.9 billion euros), according to a report published Friday by specialist defence publication IHS Jane's Intelligence Review.

Fusion reactors 'economically viable' say experts

October 2, 2015

Fusion reactors could become an economically viable means of generating electricity within a few decades, and policy makers should start planning to build them as a replacement for conventional nuclear power stations, according ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.