Study: Britons should pay 'green taxes'

February 8, 2006

A British environmental think tank says people who recycle waste and save energy and water should be taxed less than others.

The proposals, published in a report commissioned by the Green Alliance, are aimed at discouraging people from leading environmentally damaging lifestyles, The Guardian reported Wednesday.

The report outlines inefficient environmental waste as using polluting or wasteful products, including disposable batteries, single-use cameras, garden sprinklers and traditional incandescent light bulbs. Its list of efficient environmental measures includes installing cavity wall and loft insulation and using energy efficient light bulbs.

The report was based on research conducted by the Institute of Policy Studies that warns consumers are currently "locked in" to wasteful and environmentally damaging behavior patterns and need financial motivation to change their lifestyles, The Guardian said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Milkweed, monarchs, men, and madness

Related Stories

Milkweed, monarchs, men, and madness

July 30, 2015

The iconic monarch butterfly is known for its annual migration from Canada and the US to Mexico where they overwinter then fly north again in spring. University of Guam (UOG) entomologists Aubrey Moore and Ross Miller facilitated ...

States can lower electric bills with clean power plan

July 28, 2015

The U.S. electric system faces an array of challenges. Sluggish demand growth and the rise of solar power challenge the ability of utilities to recover their costs. The digital economy requires reliable power quality, and ...

Stressed out plants send animal-like signals

July 29, 2015

University of Adelaide research has shown for the first time that, despite not having a nervous system, plants use signals normally associated with animals when they encounter stress.

Nanopaper as an optical sensing platform

July 23, 2015

An international team led by the ICREA Prof Arben Merkoçi has just developed new sensing platforms based on bacterial cellulose nanopaper. These novel platforms are simple, low cost and easy to produce and present outstanding ...

Recommended for you

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.