Amtel launches 3.5 GHz chip line for WiMax

February 7, 2006

Amtel announced Tuesday it was launching a line of single-chip transceivers designed specifically for WiMax applications.

The AT86RF535A operates at 3.5 Gigahertz and is the first in a line of products designed to cover WiMax bands and interface with multiple baseband vendors, which Amtel said would make it easier for WiMax systems to handle large volumes of Internet traffic.

WiMax is a system that offers wireless Internet access for large areas and all of the residents and companies operating within.

Amtel said its new products would cover the entire WiMax frequency range and offer low-noise and power amplifiers plus other technical features that are digitally governed and offer low current consumption.

"Our transceivers will allow operators and service providers to cost-effectively reach millions of new customers with broadband access," Product Manager Jeff Leasure said in a news release. "They cannot achieve this with an off-the-shelf radio."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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