Scientists: Global warming threat to humans

Jan 31, 2006

An international group of scientists says nuclear power must be part of the attempts to fight global warming.

In an apocalyptic assessment endorsed by British Prime Minister Tony Blair, the scientists -- in a government-sponsored study -- said increasingly higher temperatures caused by the greenhouse effect pose a pressing threat to humanity.

The study forecasts the melting of the Greenland ice sheet and a resultant rise in sea levels of up to 16 feet during the next millennium, The Scotsman reported Tuesday. In response, the scientists argue, governments must use a wide range of tools, including nuclear power.

The report comes as British ministers consider authorizing construction of a new generation of nuclear reactors.

The scientists also recommend poorer nations consider investing in nuclear power plants, The Scotsman said. "Efficiency improvements and alternative energy supply, such as nuclear and renewables, are of priority for developing countries to contribute (to attempts to cut emissions)," they said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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