Scientists: Global warming threat to humans

January 31, 2006

An international group of scientists says nuclear power must be part of the attempts to fight global warming.

In an apocalyptic assessment endorsed by British Prime Minister Tony Blair, the scientists -- in a government-sponsored study -- said increasingly higher temperatures caused by the greenhouse effect pose a pressing threat to humanity.

The study forecasts the melting of the Greenland ice sheet and a resultant rise in sea levels of up to 16 feet during the next millennium, The Scotsman reported Tuesday. In response, the scientists argue, governments must use a wide range of tools, including nuclear power.

The report comes as British ministers consider authorizing construction of a new generation of nuclear reactors.

The scientists also recommend poorer nations consider investing in nuclear power plants, The Scotsman said. "Efficiency improvements and alternative energy supply, such as nuclear and renewables, are of priority for developing countries to contribute (to attempts to cut emissions)," they said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Related Stories

Recommended for you

For faster battery charging, try a quantum battery?

August 3, 2015

(Phys.org)—Physicists have shown that a quantum battery—basically, a quantum system such as a qubit that stores energy in its quantum states—can theoretically be charged at a faster rate than conventional batteries. ...

Small tilt in magnets makes them viable memory chips

August 3, 2015

University of California, Berkeley, researchers have discovered a new way to switch the polarization of nanomagnets, paving the way for high-density storage to move from hard disks onto integrated circuits.

Study calculates the speed of ice formation

August 3, 2015

Researchers at Princeton University have for the first time directly calculated the rate at which water crystallizes into ice in a realistic computer model of water molecules. The simulations, which were carried out on supercomputers, ...

4 million years at Africa's salad bar

August 3, 2015

As grasses grew more common in Africa, most major mammal groups tried grazing on them at times during the past 4 million years, but some of the animals went extinct or switched back to browsing on trees and shrubs, according ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.