Briefs: Nokia, Kyocera resolve patent dispute

January 10, 2006

Nokia and Kyocera said Tuesday they have resolved an ongoing patent dispute.

The Japanese electronics manufacturer and its mobile unit, Kyocera Wireless, have entered into a patent license agreement with Nokia whereby Kyocera will be licensed under Nokia's patents on CDMA, PHS and PDC standards.

Kyocera will pay royalties to Nokia for all Kyocera CDMA mobile phone and related products. Meanwhile, Nokia will be licensed under all of Kyocera's major patents.

The two companies have been in a series of patent disputes over mobile-phone products.

"This license agreement resolves all pending litigation between the parties without contingencies of any kind," Nokia said in a news release. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Microsoft sues Japan's Koycera for patent infringement

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