NASA announces senior management changes

Jan 25, 2006

NASA officials in Washington have announced several senior management changes involving three agency field centers.

William Parsons, director of the agency's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, will become deputy director at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Parsons joined NASA in 1990 and has served in several leadership posts, becoming Stennis director last September.

Richard Gilbrech will take over as Stennis director. He has served as deputy director of the agency's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., and deputy director of NASA's Engineering Safety Center. He started his career at Stennis in 1991, and has worked at the agency's Johnson Space Flight Center's White Sands Facility in New Mexico; the Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., and the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

G. Scott Hubbard, center director at NASA's Ames Research Center in California has accepted a position at the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute at Mountain View, Calif. He assumes the Carl Sagan Chair for the Study of Life in the Universe on Feb. 15. Marv Christensen has been named acting Ames director.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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