Morning grogginess worse than drinking

January 11, 2006

A study says morning grogginess is more debilitating than sleep deprivation. Researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder and Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital say the effects of sleep inertia are as bad or worse than being legally drunk.

The findings, published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, show that people who awaken after eight hours of sound sleep have more impaired thinking and memory skills than after being deprived of sleep for more than 24 hours.

Lead study author Kenneth Wright said test subjects had diminished short-term memory, counting skills and cognitive abilities during the groggy period upon awakening known as sleep inertia.

Researchers found subjects exhibited the most severe impairments from sleep inertia within the first three minutes after awakening. The most severe effects generally dissipated within the first 10 minutes, although its effects are often detectable for up to two hours.

Wright said the study has implications for medical professionals who are often called on to tend patients in crisis on a moment's notice, often at odd hours.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How sleep deprivation harms memory

Related Stories

How sleep deprivation harms memory

August 23, 2016

Researchers from the Universities of Groningen (Netherlands) and Pennsylvania have discovered a piece in the puzzle of how sleep deprivation negatively affects memory.

Sleep makes relearning faster and longer-lasting

August 22, 2016

Getting some sleep in between study sessions may make it easier to recall what you studied and relearn what you've forgotten, even 6 months later, according to new findings from Psychological Science, a journal of the Association ...

Why apnea patients are prone to suffer from glaucoma

July 22, 2016

Scientists at Hokkaido University have successfully measured the eye pressure of sleeping patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome for the first time, finding an unexpected correlation with glaucoma.

Recommended for you

Force triggers gene expression by stretching chromatin

August 26, 2016

How genes in our DNA are expressed into traits within a cell is a complicated mystery with many players, the main suspects being chemical. However, a new study by University of Illinois researchers and collaborators in China ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.