EPA announces latest Green Power list

January 25, 2006

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released its latest "Green Power" list Wednesday, led by the U.S. Air Force and the Whole Foods Market chain.

The list of the U.S. companies, organizations and government institutions that have voluntarily bought the most renewable energy is released quarterly.

The EPA's Green Power Partners are now purchasing more than 4 million megawatt hours of renewable energy annually, enough energy to power more than 300,000 homes a year.

The Air Force again leads the Top 25 list, purchasing more than 1 million MWh annually for its bases across the nation. The Air Force has held the No. 1 spot since the list started in September 2004.

The Whole Foods Market chain -- the world's largest retailer of natural and organic foods -- surpassed both Safeway Inc., and Johnson & Johnson to lead all corporate purchasers after increasing its renewal energy purchases to more than 450 thousand MWh annually.

The EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy follow the Air Force in purchase size among government institutions.

Green power is electricity generated from environmentally preferable renewable resources such as solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, and low-impact biomass and hydro resources.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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