China develops magnetic levitation train

January 10, 2006
China develops magnetic levitation train

Chinese engineers have developed a medium- to low-speed magnetic levitation train that travels 93 miles an hour.

The quiet low-pollution train will be mainly used in urban areas, Xinhua news service reported.

The train consumes less energy than faster maglev trains.

China opened the world's first commercial magnetic levitation train with the highest velocity of more than 267 miles per hour in Shanghai in 2002, based on German technology.

Maglev train lines have been considered as an effective means to deal with the heavy passenger flow in the Yangtze River Delta, one of the economic powerhouses in China, the news service said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: The future of rail travel, and why it doesn't look like Hyperloop

Related Stories

Japan's 311 mph super maglev train takes passengers for run

November 19, 2014

Japan's magnetically levitating maglev train, faster than Japan's bullet train, is doing test runs with passengers, members of the public, in central Japan. The world's fastest maglev train, the 311 mph (500 km/h) Series ...

Can magnetically levitating trains run at 3,000km/h?

July 10, 2014

Trains that use magnets to levitate above the tracks might sound like something from Back to the Future, but the concept of magnetic levitation has been around for many years. Maglev trains, which use this technology, were ...

Enclosed tube maglev system tested in China

May 9, 2014

A Chinese researcher's concept of a super-maglev reaching higher speeds was put to the test recently according to a detailed report appearing earlier this week in the Daily Mail.

Japan's maglev train runs test at over 310 mph (w/ Video)

September 2, 2013

(Phys.org) —Moving toward its goal of building a high-speed magnetic levitation (maglev) train line between Tokyo and Osaka, Central Japan Railway Co has resumed testing of its L0 (L Zero) train—demonstrating speeds just ...

Recommended for you

Which insects are the best pollinators?

September 3, 2015

Bees top the charts for pollination success according to one of the first studies of insect functionality within pollination networks, published today by researchers at the University of Bristol and the University of St Andrews.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.