Report: China's AIDS epidemic is worsening

January 25, 2006

International health experts say China's AIDS epidemic is among the fastest-growing in the world and will likely increase.

About 70,000 Chinese were infected last year with human immunodeficiency virus, the virus that causes AIDS, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday. Now, according to a report by the Chinese Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization, it's estimated about 650,000 people in China are infected with HIV.

The pace of growth of new infections in China is about 10 percent, the Journal said, with death rates also rising. Approximately 25,000 Chinese died last year from complications related to AIDS.

"Make no mistake, China's AIDS epidemic is growing," Henk Bekedam, the WHO's representative in China, said. According to the report, only about a quarter of all victims know they are infected with AIDS.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Science and innovation: out of the frying pan and into the fire

Related Stories

Paris climate summit: huge stakes, deep divides

November 23, 2015

Still reeling from the worst terrorist attacks in French history, Paris will host nearly 140 world leaders gathering next week to spearhead a climate pact tasked with keeping Earth liveable for humanity.

Global carbon pricing off menu at Paris climate talks

November 24, 2015

Climate experts say the need to agree on a global carbon price to cut pollution and aid clean technologies is a no-brainer, and yet the topic will have no place at the upcoming Paris climate talks.

Climate summit: The crunch issues

November 17, 2015

On November 30, some 120 heads of government and state will kick off a high-stakes negotiation to curb global warming and help poor countries cope with its impacts.

Recommended for you

Moonlighting molecules: Finding new uses for old enzymes

November 27, 2015

A collaboration between the University of Cambridge and MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, has led researchers to identify a potentially significant new application for a well-known ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.