Unusual water recycling device is revealed

December 8, 2005
Water

British scientists have developed a rooftop vegetation recycling system that allows water to be used twice before being discarded.

The Green Roof Water Recycling System uses semi-aquatic plants to treat waste washing water, which can then be reused for activities such as flushing toilets.

The device is the brainchild of Chris Shirley-Smith, whose company, Water Works UK, is collaborating with Imperial College London and Cranfield University.

So-called grey water from washbasins, baths and showers is pumped up to the rooftop system, which consists of an inclined framework of interconnected horizontal troughs. Planted in the troughs are specially chosen plants.

Dissolved pollutants in the water are taken up by the plants' roots, leaving "green water," or non-drinkable water. The scientists say such water can then be dyed with a vegetable color to signal its non-potable status, or it can be used to flush toilets or water a garden.

The researchers note more than half the water used in homes and workplace does not need to be potable, yet it comes from the same water source that feeds kitchen faucets.

The researchers hope to market their invention commercially during the second half of 2006.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Wastewater to irrigate, fertilize and generate energy

Related Stories

Wastewater to irrigate, fertilize and generate energy

September 2, 2015

To meet the requirements of Asian cities, researchers are adapting an idea they have already applied in Germany for comprehensive water management: They are developing a concept for reducing water use, treating wastewater ...

Recycling permanent magnets in one go

September 2, 2015

Electric motors or wind turbines are driven by powerful permanent magnets. The most powerful ones are based on the rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium. In future, a new process route realized by Fraunhofer researchers ...

Scientists find electrifying solution to sticky problem

August 25, 2015

Inspired by the limitations of biomimetic glues in wet environments, scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have invented a glue that will harden when a voltage is applied to it. This ...

Recommended for you

Ancient walnut forests linked to languages, trade routes

September 4, 2015

If Persian walnut trees could talk, they might tell of the numerous traders who moved along the Silk Roads' thousands of miles over thousands of years, carrying among their valuable merchandise the seeds that would turn into ...

Long-sought chiral anomaly detected in crystalline material

September 3, 2015

A study by Princeton researchers presents evidence for a long-sought phenomenon—first theorized in the 1960s and predicted to be found in crystals in 1983—called the "chiral anomaly" in a metallic compound of sodium and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.