S.C. may teach human origin theories

December 13, 2005

Proponents of teaching various theories of human origin, including creationism, have gained support from the state's public school reform oversight panel.

The Education Oversight Committee voted 8-7 Monday evening to strike from high school biology standards wording that required schools to teach only evolution, The (Columbia, S.C.) State reported Tuesday.

South Carolina's high school biology instruction incorporates the widely acknowledged theory espoused by Charles Darwin, whose 19th century research led him to conclude life evolved during millions of years from simple cells that adapted to the environment.

Those who believe in creationism generally believe mankind's origin is the result of divine action.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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