NJ is 1st state to fund stem-cell research

December 18, 2005

New Jersey has become the first state to use public money to fund human stem cell research. The state announced $5 million in grants Friday to be split among 17 projects, the New York Times reported. Only three involve human embryonic stem cells, with others studying animals or using adult stem cells.

"The grants we have awarded today are based on science, not politics, and have been conceived by some of the brightest minds and best institutions in our state," acting Gov. Richard J. Codey said in a statement. "This funding will hopefully set the stage for a new era in medical treatments that will ease the suffering of millions and ultimately save lives."

The research that won funding was approved by a committee from the New Jersey Institute of Technology.

The Senate approved a $350 million bond referendum to fund stem cell research. The measure must also pass the Assembly before it goes to the voters, and passage in the lower house is not assured.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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