NASA signs homeland security agreement

December 15, 2005

NASA and Homeland Security officials have signed a memorandum of understanding to collaborate and coordinate research and development projects.

The agreement allows the two government departments to apply joint expertise and technologies to homeland security and develop complex systems designed to protect the nation.

"It's with great pride that NASA offers the talents of its world class researchers and engineers to assist DHS in its mission," NASA Assistant Administrator for Security and Program Protection David Saleeba said.

The agreement provides a mechanism for DHS and NASA to coordinate evaluation of existing technologies; accelerate promising technologies; undertake joint research and share resources and personnel, NASA said.

"This collaboration will add to the resources we need to adapt and develop technologies that keep us one step ahead of those who intend to do this country harm," said Charles McQueary, the Department of Homeland Security's under secretary for science and technology.

NASA said each project will be defined by an implementing agreement outlining specific terms. The agreements will provide for the use of facilities, personnel, cooperative projects and transfer of funds, as appropriate.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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