N.D. bans intelligent design debate

December 28, 2005

Students in North Dakota debating programs have been banned from broaching the topic of intelligent design.

"We're doing this because we don't want to exclude any students from public forum debate at state," said Robert Hetler of the North Dakota High School Activities Association. "Some schools were afraid parents wouldn't allow their kids to do this one."

The National Forensic League recommended debating intelligent design in January, but instead, North Dakota students will debate the national topic for February, which will be released Jan. 1, the Fargo Forum reported.

Intelligent design holds that living things are so complex that they must have been created by a higher being. Earlier this month, a federal judge barred a Pennsylvania public school district from teaching the theory in biology class, saying it was a variation on creationism.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Smart microgrids to help data centers, farm communities use locally produced power

Related Stories

Recommended for you

How bees naturally vaccinate their babies

July 31, 2015

When it comes to vaccinating their babies, bees don't have a choice—they naturally immunize their offspring against specific diseases found in their environments. And now for the first time, scientists have discovered how ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

Exoplanets 20/20: Looking back to the future

July 31, 2015

Geoff Marcy remembers the hair standing up on the back of his neck. Paul Butler remembers being dead tired. The two men had just made history: the first confirmation of a planet orbiting another star.

Earth flyby of 'space peanut' captured in new video

July 31, 2015

NASA scientists have used two giant, Earth-based radio telescopes to bounce radar signals off a passing asteroid and produce images of the peanut-shaped body as it approached close to Earth this past weekend.

Binary star system precisely timed with pulsar's gamma-rays

July 31, 2015

Pulsars are rapidly rotating compact remnants born in the explosions of massive stars. They can be observed through their lighthouse-like beams of radio waves and gamma-rays. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.