Study: hostile drivers same outside car

December 29, 2005

University of Minnesota researchers have found that most aggressive drivers also tend to be hostile outside their cars.

"People don't change their behavior dramatically when they get in the car," Kathleen Harder, co-author of the study, told the St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer Press.

She and two others administered a battery of personality, emotional and behavioral questions to a group of 710 drivers between the ages of 18 and 45.

They discovered that a group who scored as "high hostile" in the survey became "more emotionally activated while driving" than people labeled as "low hostile," Harder said.

As a group, the high-hostiles reported driving after drinking more often than the low-hostiles, taking more risks while driving and becoming angrier at slow drivers, police, discourteous drivers and road construction, she said.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Shareholders endorse Google's course

Related Stories

Shareholders endorse Google's course

June 3, 2015

Google shareholders on Wednesday endorsed the course set by the Internet titan, rejecting proposals to dilute its power structure and scrutinize investments in renewable energy.

Recommended for you

Trade in invasive plants is blossoming

October 3, 2015

Every day, hundreds of different plant species—many of them listed as invasive—are traded online worldwide on auction platforms. This exacerbates the problem of uncontrollable biological invasions.

How much for that Nobel prize in the window?

October 3, 2015

No need to make peace in the Middle East, resolve one of science's great mysteries or pen a masterpiece: the easiest way to get yourself a Nobel prize may be to buy one.

Drone market to hit $10 billion by 2024: experts

October 3, 2015

The market for military drones is expected to almost double by 2024 to beyond $10 billion (8.9 billion euros), according to a report published Friday by specialist defence publication IHS Jane's Intelligence Review.

Fusion reactors 'economically viable' say experts

October 2, 2015

Fusion reactors could become an economically viable means of generating electricity within a few decades, and policy makers should start planning to build them as a replacement for conventional nuclear power stations, according ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.